Can I get a visa for my sister in law?

Absolutely zero. You cannot obtain a visa for someone else – your sister-in-law needs to apply herself (or through a lawyer).

Can I apply for a visa for my sister in law?

As a U.S. citizen , you can not file the FORM I-130 on behalf of your sister-in-law. You also will have a challenge filing a PERM on behalf of your sister-in-law. Moreover, there is no specific non- immigrant visa for a caregiver.

Can I sponsor my sister in law for tourist visa?

UAE residents (expats with a valid residence visa) can sponsor their first degree relatives (parents, siblings, children), and possibly second degree relatives, for a visit visa to Abu Dhabi, Dubai, RAK, Sharjah, and other emirates.

Can I sponsor my sister in law to UK?

Unless she is dependant on you and has severely bad health – she will have to qualify for a visa in her own right. In reality this means she’ll need to find a tier 2 sponsor in the UK. M.

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Can I sponsor my sister in law for green card?

Under U.S. immigration law, there are certain relatives that U.S. citizens are allowed to petition for permanent resident status for. Brothers and sisters are included among the family members citizens can sponsor for a green card. As a note, a citizen has to be at least 21 to petition for a green card for a sibling.

How can I get my sister in law to USA?

To bring your sibling to the U.S., there are five steps you must complete:

  1. File Form I-130.
  2. Receive Form I-130 Approval and Proceed to the National Visa Center.
  3. File an Affidavit of Support.
  4. Bring Sibling to the U.S. on an Immigrant Visa.
  5. Wait for the Permanent Resident Card.

Can my sister in law sponsor me?

Yes you can sponsor your sister in law if you meet the poverty guidelines (see the I-864p) required for the I-864.

How can I apply for sibling visa?

A visitor visa (B-1 / B-2) is filed by the person seeking to come to the United States. It is filed electronically with the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in their respective country. Your brother will need to complete the DS-160 online visa application and schedule an interview with an embassy or consulate where he lives.

How much does it cost to sponsor a visa?

How Much Does It Cost to Sponsor a Visa? In general, a visa sponsorship costs approximately $4000 but may cost $8-9,000 if a company has more than fifty employees and 50% of those employees are foreign nationals.

What is the minimum salary for sponsorship?

The most common minimum annual income required to sponsor a spouse or family member for a green card is $21,775. This assumes that the sponsor — the U.S. citizen or current green card holder — is not in active military duty and is sponsoring only one relative.

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Can I bring my sister to UK permanently?

When you have indefinite leave to remain in the UK or are a British Citizen, you can bring your siblings to the country. … When you have an indefinite leave to remain in the UK, you can bring your siblings to the country. This is also relevant for those who are already British citizens.

Can a brother sponsor his sister to UK?

If you have UK citizenship or permanent residence (indefinite leave to remain) as a non-EU/EFTA national, your family members can apply for a UK Family Visa known as the ‘family of a settled person’ visa. This UK Family Visa will allow relatives or partners to stay in the UK for 6 months or more.

Can U.S. citizen petition sister in law?

U.S. citizens can, under federal immigration law, petition for (sponsor) their foreign-born brothers and sisters to come to the United States.

Can I sponsor my brother-in-law to US?

You cannot sponsor your brother-in-law personally. A U.S. citizen can only petition for a parent, spouse, son/daughter, or child.

Can I petition my brother-in-law to US?

Unfortunately, you cannot petition for your brother-in-law to obtain an immigrant visa. Your husband can petition for him, but he has to be a US citizen first.